Summer Conference, Part One

Posted by Jessica Meek in Picture This. No Comments

29th July

July 18-22, 2016.

A normal work week for most people, but a wild one for the Mazza Museum. During those five days, the spectacular Summer Conference took place. Five Days. Twelve authors and illustrators. Two free shoulder bags. Innumerable pastries. This adds up to one incredible week (and two blog posts).

Day One:
Chris Barton, Barney Saltzberg, and Rosemary Wells began the

week on a good note–in Saltzberg’s case, literally. He incorporated his original songs into his presentation, and the result was as entertaining as it was informative.

Conference-goers were also able to hear about Chris Barton’s process as an author, and the seemingly insignificant circumstances that led to momentous book ideas and life changes. Rosemary Wells gave the audience an inside look at her studio and the way she creates her art.
Autographing ensued, and the first day of the conference concluded.

Day Two:
Marie-Louise Gay and … Read More »



Finals and Final Goodbyes: Part 2

Posted by Jacob King in Jake's Journal. No Comments

28th July

Tomorrow is it … and I can’t believe it! Tomorrow is the day I board the plane to leave beautiful Buenos Aires, Argentina behind. It is difficult to think about how quickly the time passed. Finals are all done, and many of the study abroad friends I’ve made here have flown back to the U.S. As I’m writing this last blog post, it doesn’t even seem real. I can vividly remember when I arrived and had big dreams of being tan (which did not come true) and all the things I would do.

Everything in this city was so new and fresh to me, and I could not wait to get my hands on it all. It’s surreal that now I’m writing a goodbye post. Time spent inside the city has been beyond eye opening and incredible (I’m using these strong adjectives with total honesty). … Read More »



Matane (See You Later), Japan!

Posted by Joni Montgomery in Trading Cultures. No Comments

28th July

Our final week in Japan began with an animal ethics lecture. It was interesting to hear how the Japanese people ultimately view their animals in order to understand the differences we had observed. There are essentially two extreme models in veterinary medicine. One is the mechanic model and the other is the pediatrician model. The mechanic model treats and fixes what is broken to a certain extent ­– but if the cost to repair is too great, it is “junked” and the newer model is purchased. The pediatrician model treats and fixes everything no matter the cost, time or energy that is needed. In the United States, most veterinarians fall somewhere in between these two extreme models. However, we noticed that many Japanese vets tend to lean more toward the pediatrician model since Japan’s foremost religions preach reincarnation.

In the afternoon, we attended a … Read More »



A Hop, Skip, and A Week Away…

Posted by Jacob King in Jake's Journal. No Comments

20th July

That’s it … one more week. I truly can’t believe this Yankee is a mere seven days closer to bidding farewell with beautiful Buenos Aires (yes, I am very emotional).

I thought the expression, “time flies when you’re having fun” was just something old people said to young people when they realized they’re getting old and time is passing. However, sitting here writing this blog has shown me how much truth there is to the expression. It’s hard not to keep asking myself where the time went. Although I’m reminiscing, I still remind myself that there is a week left (yay!) … and finals (ugh!).

If it wasn’t hard enough thinking about saying goodbye to Argentina, to make things worse, I have two more finals to get through. I’ve spent a great deal of time prepping and preparing for my exams, and when I walk … Read More »



Temple Tempest

Posted by Jessica Meek in Picture This. No Comments

18th July

As art rotation in the Mazza Museum wound down, I went home to Hawaii for the second half of June. After my brief but lovely stay there, I flew back to Ohio and immediately jumped into the museum’s next project — building a temple?

The Enchanted Brush Exhibit in the Lea Gallery has a jungle theme this year, and Dan the curator happened to have a large Cambodian/Hindu-inspired temple wall that he thought would fit well with that theme. Our job was to increase the amount of surface area of the temple to fill the wall of the Lea Gallery. I’m no stonemason, but luckily this particular temple wall was made of foam and was less than a foot thick. Does that make me a foam-mason?

The following days were a storm of activity. Turning giant sheets of minty green foam into time-weathered … Read More »



Uproarious Uehara Weekend

Posted by Joni Montgomery in Trading Cultures. No Comments

15th July

Greetings!

I spent a refreshing, fun and educational weekend during a home stay with the Uehara family. Mr. Uehara works at the Rakuno dairy farm and Mrs. Uehara is an alumna of the Dr. Beckett scholarship (she came to Findlay for a whole school year about 10 years ago). They have a 1-year-old daughter, Yuriko, and a 4-year-old son, Kazuyoshi, who is super smart.

For breakfast Saturday morning, my palate was immersed in Japanese cuisine. After our feast, we visited the local farmers’ market and bought fresh vegetables. It was fun to see the similarities to our farmers’ markets in the states.

Next, we visited the Machimura farm. Hokkaido is known in Japan for its dairy cows and Mr. Machimura is considered the grandfather of the Japanese dairy industry – two thirds of all Holstein cows in Japan are descendants of the Machimura lines! When Hokkaido was pioneered in 1873, the … Read More »



Rotation Elation

Posted by Jessica Meek in Picture This. No Comments

8th July

June was a whirlwind of activity at the museum. Why? Rotation. Almost every single piece of art in the museum had to be switched out for new art in new exhibits; talk about a massive undertaking! I did a lot of taking things down, removing frames, putting art back in its correct location, updating the catalogue, finding new art, framing, and hanging. I spent a lot of time cleaning glass.

The Mazza Museum has over 10,000 works in its collection. Only a select few of these can be displayed at a time. For space efficient storage, each piece of art is matted and kept in a sleeve. 
They are only framed when they are to be hung. While this is clearly the best way to handle such a large volume of work, it means that folks at the museum have to be … Read More »



Things Yankees Do

Posted by Jacob King in Jake's Journal. No Comments

6th July

So, what is a Yankee to do in Buenos Aires when finals aren’t for a couple of weeks? Well, you grab another Yankee and explore!

Every single day of this past week I’ve been out really working on my relationship with the city, and let me tell ya, things are moving fast. To start off the week, we got out to enjoy some beautiful (much needed) sunshine. It was quite tragic having to set my alarm to get up, but the views were definitely worth getting out of bed. I took the bus, and my friends and I met up in Puerto Madero. I’ve talked about this part of the city but I’ll fill you in a little more.

Puerto Madero is one of the more upscale parts of the city (very rich, to be blunt). If you’re from Ohio, you’ll understand what I mean … Read More »



The Early Bird…Learns How to Milk

Posted by Joni Montgomery in Trading Cultures. No Comments

5th July

Hello everyone!

Our next two days started bright and early at the dairy cow milking barn at 5 a.m. It was difficult to crawl out of bed that early in the morning, but the milking experience was well worth it! We had to clean the cows’ udders, test for mastitis (infection in the udder), hook the machine onto the udders, remove the machine when finished, and clean the udders again. (Got milk? Not without a little work!) We were also given a tour of the dairy farm facility. There was one pen that had a milking machine which was entirely robotic. When the cows want to eat they enter a stall which scans their collar and determines how much feed needs to be dropped and if that cow has or has not been milked yet. If the cow hasn’t been milked, the … Read More »






From the Blog

Wondering what it's really like to be at The University of Findlay? Follow our bloggers and read—and sometimes listen and watch—their experiences. Real Oilers. Real stories. Real life.

A Day in the Life

During a session I attended a few years ago that offered pointers regarding how to navigate graduate school, one University of Findlay professor said...

Music to my ears?

I’ve been involved in choirs for as long as I can remember, but none of that prepared me for the challenge of coming into...

Practical Magic: How Marathon Petroleum Corporation Fuels Experiential Learning

At this time last year, I stepped outside my comfort zone and accepted an internship with Brand Marketing at Marathon Petroleum Corporation (MPC) for...

Adjustments

When you go to a new place, whether it’s a new city/new school/new country, everyone needs to make some adjustments with the new things...

Pipe Dreams and Racist Rhetoric

I know the distinctive sound of my gurgling pipes, and I dread it. My plumbing stopped working several times until I finally spent thousands...

Gettin’ My Dance On … and Making Miracles Happen!

Miracle Network Dance Marathon. A year ago, those four words didn’t mean much to me at all. Today, those words ignite a fire inside...

What’s So Great About Greek Life?

Before I moved in, you could ask just about anyone I knew, “Do you think Tatum will join Greek life?” and their immediate answer...

Push Yourself to the (Browns) Edge

Is there a day that you can honestly say changed your life? A day that impacted your education, career and social life?

Mine was on...

Let’s make this journey wonderful!

Hi! If you are wondering who I am or why you should even be interested to meet me, here’s my backstory. My full name...

A Major Decision

Senior year of high school is such a fun and nostalgic time filled with lots of firsts and lasts. Even more, it is usually...

Nooks and Books: Places to Study on Campus

If I asked you, “What would you rather be doing than studying right now?,” most of us could probably think of 1,001 ways to...

Not Fade Away

Galvanizing intellectual and emotional events have distinguished my graduate school experience thus far. I couldn’t wait to begin the University of Findlay’s Master of...

“The Greatest Experience on Earth”

College. At one point, it was stereotyped as a four-year party where students took a few classes and had little responsibility. Now, college has...

Back in #OilerNation—Chapter Two!

Coming back to college as a second year is … weird. I didn’t have to stress out about if I got everything checked off...

Why Are You Here?

On my very first day of class here at the University of Findlay, I was asked a question in my Orientation to Psychology class...