Tag: pre-veterinary medicine


The Final Stretch

Posted by Madison Simmons in Tales from the Barn. No Comments

18th April

Countdowns are well on their way as the end of the semester is quickly approaching! There’s great anticipation, tension and horror for the arrival of graduation. We have worked so hard to finally reach this point in our lives and with that comes pride, satisfaction and joy. However, fear, uncertainty and anxiety follow very close behind the joy of graduation. For the past 17 years we have been told what to do, where to be and when, which classes to take and more. We have come to know the routine of classes starting in late August, having a week off of school every other month, and three months of no school for the summer. (Put this on repeat until graduation!) Now, the reality of not having to attend classes, not having that set routine and not being surrounded by the same … Read More »



Vet School Visiting!

Posted by Joni Montgomery in Trading Cultures. No Comments

19th August

Since many Findlay students are headed to vet school in the future, I will share a quick overview of five vet schools I visited on my return trip from my Colorado equine internship!

Oklahoma State University College of Veterinary Medicine

No tracking, all students take the same courses and do not pick a focus.
Class size is 88 students: 30+ out-of-state and 50+ in-state students.
Schedule for the first three years is the same: lectures in the morning and labs in the afternoon.
No classroom time with hands on animals in the first two years except in clubs.
Membership in clubs is encouraged to gain specific clinical experiences in areas where students desire to practice (i.e. equine club, exotic animal club, etc. . .).

Third year is a transition year from classroom to clinical with Jr. surgery (surgery on non-live animals).
Fourth year is the clinical year.
Minimal fee for … Read More »



Colorado Equine Internship!

Posted by Joni Montgomery in Trading Cultures. No Comments

9th August

When I returned from Japan, I jumped into my little red car and headed to the great west. I have spent the past three weeks interning at Colorado Equine Veterinary Services in Peyton, Colorado. My first day of work began on a Sunday within an hour of my arrival. A colicky horse was hospitalized for fluids and close monitoring. I knew this internship would be a totally new experience for me when I heard that I needed to wake up and take care of it in the middle of the night. Charlie, one of the techs, taught me what to do the first night and then I was on my own after office hours for the rest of this horse’s stay.

Due to complications, the horse ended up staying two long weeks. Thus, this student encountered a new experience: the horse … Read More »



Matane (See You Later), Japan!

Posted by Joni Montgomery in Trading Cultures. No Comments

28th July

Our final week in Japan began with an animal ethics lecture. It was interesting to hear how the Japanese people ultimately view their animals in order to understand the differences we had observed. There are essentially two extreme models in veterinary medicine. One is the mechanic model and the other is the pediatrician model. The mechanic model treats and fixes what is broken to a certain extent ­– but if the cost to repair is too great, it is “junked” and the newer model is purchased. The pediatrician model treats and fixes everything no matter the cost, time or energy that is needed. In the United States, most veterinarians fall somewhere in between these two extreme models. However, we noticed that many Japanese vets tend to lean more toward the pediatrician model since Japan’s foremost religions preach reincarnation.

In the afternoon, we attended a … Read More »



Uproarious Uehara Weekend

Posted by Joni Montgomery in Trading Cultures. No Comments

15th July

Greetings!

I spent a refreshing, fun and educational weekend during a home stay with the Uehara family. Mr. Uehara works at the Rakuno dairy farm and Mrs. Uehara is an alumna of the Dr. Beckett scholarship (she came to Findlay for a whole school year about 10 years ago). They have a 1-year-old daughter, Yuriko, and a 4-year-old son, Kazuyoshi, who is super smart.

For breakfast Saturday morning, my palate was immersed in Japanese cuisine. After our feast, we visited the local farmers’ market and bought fresh vegetables. It was fun to see the similarities to our farmers’ markets in the states.

Next, we visited the Machimura farm. Hokkaido is known in Japan for its dairy cows and Mr. Machimura is considered the grandfather of the Japanese dairy industry – two thirds of all Holstein cows in Japan are descendants of the Machimura lines! When Hokkaido was pioneered in 1873, the … Read More »



The Early Bird…Learns How to Milk

Posted by Joni Montgomery in Trading Cultures. No Comments

5th July

Hello everyone!

Our next two days started bright and early at the dairy cow milking barn at 5 a.m. It was difficult to crawl out of bed that early in the morning, but the milking experience was well worth it! We had to clean the cows’ udders, test for mastitis (infection in the udder), hook the machine onto the udders, remove the machine when finished, and clean the udders again. (Got milk? Not without a little work!) We were also given a tour of the dairy farm facility. There was one pen that had a milking machine which was entirely robotic. When the cows want to eat they enter a stall which scans their collar and determines how much feed needs to be dropped and if that cow has or has not been milked yet. If the cow hasn’t been milked, the … Read More »



From Epidemiology to Etiquette

Posted by Joni Montgomery in Trading Cultures. No Comments

24th June

Konnichiwa! (Hello!)

Our week began in a classroom with the Epidemiology veterinary students. In a nutshell, Epidemiology is the study of diseases, disease distribution and disease control. Each of the students had researched a disease, and one by one, they shared their findings with us. It was fascinating to hear what they were working on and learn about some of the common diseases in the world. Many of them had even traveled to other countries in order to collect data! I have always been passionate about zoonotic diseases (diseases which are transferrable between animals and people) so some of their topics really spiked my interest!

In the afternoon, Professor Kitazawa, who came to Findlay this past spring, taught us about animal pharmacology. He even showed us how certain drugs can speed up and/or slow down heart rate by using a mouse heart hooked … Read More »



Weekend Escapades

Posted by Joni Montgomery in Trading Cultures. No Comments

17th June

Hello from the other side of the world!

 

My weekend stay with Marina started off at full speed. Marina is a graduate of the Rakuno Gakuen/Findlay exchange program. Many of you may have met her when she came to Findlay in 2013. On Friday night, we all went out to eat at a Japanese-Korean barbecue. Many Japanese (and Korean) restaurants, such as the one we went to, have a grill or cooker built into the table in front of you. Diners order raw meats and vegetables and then barbecue them at their tables. It was delicious! Some of the interesting “meats” we tried there were pig intestines and cow tongue. The intestines had a good flavor, but they were SO chewy. It was like chewing meat-flavored gum. Surprisingly, cow tongue was delicious! It tasted like a really good steak.

 

Marina quickly figured out the way … Read More »



Embracing Experiences

Posted by Joni Montgomery in Trading Cultures. No Comments

9th June

Hello from Japan again!

During our first week at Rakuno Gakuen University, we started at the small animal veterinary clinic, where we shadowed veterinarians and vet students during clinical hours and surgeries. I saw ultrasounds, x-rays, MRI’s, and CT’s on Monday as I tracked with the internal medicine students. On Tuesday, I switched to shadowing the surgery students. The first case was a cat that severely broke its leg jumping off a sofa. The surgery was long and complex because the bone broke in September and was cast improperly – the bone was also totally rotated.

Veterinary medicine differs greatly between Japan and the States. This cat was 16 years old, and had numerous other medical issues. The easiest and cheapest thing to do would be to amputate the leg, however, that is not the way of Japanese veterinary medicine. They try to do literally … Read More »



Sushi, Sightseeing & Sports

Posted by Joni Montgomery in Trading Cultures. 1 Comment

1st June

On our first Saturday here, Megan, Maria, Grace and I went to Otaru with our hosts. Otaru is an ocean town known for its glass. We ate sushi (raw fish) and went shopping. The raw fish wasn’t terrible, but I do not foresee myself choosing to eat it again any time soon. Tuna was the best one because you could actually tear off pieces instead of having to shove the whole thing in your mouth! The sushi went around the restaurant on a conveyor belt (see picture above). If you saw something you wanted, you simply had to grab it. The price of the food was indicated by a plate color code system. Each plate contained a microchip. When you finished eating, your stack of plates was scanned to determine your bill. (See picture on left)

Adventurer Grace chose an adorable … Read More »






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