Trading Cultures

As a land-locked pre-veterinary student, there are two things which excite me the most – animals and world travel. Spring semester and this summer, I am participating in the student exchange program with Rakuno Gakuen University Veterinary School in Hokkaido, Japan. I would love to have you tag along, learn with me and see things through my eyes!


Vet School Visiting!

Posted by Joni Montgomery in Trading Cultures. No Comments

19th August

Since many Findlay students are headed to vet school in the future, I will share a quick overview of five vet schools I visited on my return trip from my Colorado equine internship!

Oklahoma State University College of Veterinary Medicine

No tracking, all students take the same courses and do not pick a focus.
Class size is 88 students: 30+ out-of-state and 50+ in-state students.
Schedule for the first three years is the same: lectures in the morning and labs in the afternoon.
No classroom time with hands on animals in the first two years except in clubs.
Membership in clubs is encouraged to gain specific clinical experiences in areas where students desire to practice (i.e. equine club, exotic animal club, etc. . .).

Third year is a transition year from classroom to clinical with Jr. surgery (surgery on non-live animals).
Fourth year is the clinical year.
Minimal fee for … Read More »



Colorado Equine Internship!

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9th August

When I returned from Japan, I jumped into my little red car and headed to the great west. I have spent the past three weeks interning at Colorado Equine Veterinary Services in Peyton, Colorado. My first day of work began on a Sunday within an hour of my arrival. A colicky horse was hospitalized for fluids and close monitoring. I knew this internship would be a totally new experience for me when I heard that I needed to wake up and take care of it in the middle of the night. Charlie, one of the techs, taught me what to do the first night and then I was on my own after office hours for the rest of this horse’s stay.

Due to complications, the horse ended up staying two long weeks. Thus, this student encountered a new experience: the horse … Read More »



Matane (See You Later), Japan!

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28th July

Our final week in Japan began with an animal ethics lecture. It was interesting to hear how the Japanese people ultimately view their animals in order to understand the differences we had observed. There are essentially two extreme models in veterinary medicine. One is the mechanic model and the other is the pediatrician model. The mechanic model treats and fixes what is broken to a certain extent ­– but if the cost to repair is too great, it is “junked” and the newer model is purchased. The pediatrician model treats and fixes everything no matter the cost, time or energy that is needed. In the United States, most veterinarians fall somewhere in between these two extreme models. However, we noticed that many Japanese vets tend to lean more toward the pediatrician model since Japan’s foremost religions preach reincarnation.

In the afternoon, we attended a … Read More »



Uproarious Uehara Weekend

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15th July

Greetings!

I spent a refreshing, fun and educational weekend during a home stay with the Uehara family. Mr. Uehara works at the Rakuno dairy farm and Mrs. Uehara is an alumna of the Dr. Beckett scholarship (she came to Findlay for a whole school year about 10 years ago). They have a 1-year-old daughter, Yuriko, and a 4-year-old son, Kazuyoshi, who is super smart.

For breakfast Saturday morning, my palate was immersed in Japanese cuisine. After our feast, we visited the local farmers’ market and bought fresh vegetables. It was fun to see the similarities to our farmers’ markets in the states.

Next, we visited the Machimura farm. Hokkaido is known in Japan for its dairy cows and Mr. Machimura is considered the grandfather of the Japanese dairy industry – two thirds of all Holstein cows in Japan are descendants of the Machimura lines! When Hokkaido was pioneered in 1873, the … Read More »



The Early Bird…Learns How to Milk

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5th July

Hello everyone!

Our next two days started bright and early at the dairy cow milking barn at 5 a.m. It was difficult to crawl out of bed that early in the morning, but the milking experience was well worth it! We had to clean the cows’ udders, test for mastitis (infection in the udder), hook the machine onto the udders, remove the machine when finished, and clean the udders again. (Got milk? Not without a little work!) We were also given a tour of the dairy farm facility. There was one pen that had a milking machine which was entirely robotic. When the cows want to eat they enter a stall which scans their collar and determines how much feed needs to be dropped and if that cow has or has not been milked yet. If the cow hasn’t been milked, the … Read More »






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